Subcribe
Recipe
See Ingredients

Sheep Cheese Soup

  1. Cut the onion into cubes, roast it with lard until golden.
  2. Add cumin, ground red pepper, sheep cheese and potatoes cut into cubes.
  3. Stir and pour it over with 1l of hot water. Cook until the potatoes become tender.
  4. Savour with salt and ground pepper. Stir the soup until smooth, you may also add cream and sprinkle with chives.
  5. Serve with gnocchi or bread cut into cubes and baked with lard.

 

Source: Slovak Tourist Board

 

Recipe

Bean Soup with Smoked Pork Knee

The cuisine of northern Slovakia is influenced by the harsh climatic conditions of the area, where it is usually intensively cold at least three months per year. This is one of the reasons why smoked meat, potatoes, sauerkraut, dairy products and pulses are typical for this cuisine. In Slovakia, the pulses belong to the oldest cultivated crops. The most famous dish, still popular of the Slovak kitchen, is the bean soup, which used to be part of the Christmas Eve dinner for many families.

Recipe

Pasties with Sheep Cheese

The traditional Slovak dishes are most commonly referred to as gnocchi with sheep cheese (Bryndzové halušky), sheep cheese (Bryndzové pirohy) and other dishes produced using traditional methods.The sheep cheese is a soft salty cheese made of sheep’s milk with a strong aroma and taste. Like Bryndzové halušky, Bryndzové pirohy is a characteristic Slovak dish that belongs to traditional Slovak specialties. The recipe is quite simple. The preparation procedure, however, is quite different and we can distinguish them reliably by sight and taste.

Recipe

Cauliflower Croquettes

Meatballs of various types are an integral part of Romanian cuisine and the word chiftea (pl. chiftele) (pronounced /kif-te-a/ – /kif-te-le/) is clearly an indication of their Turkish origin, the word being a corruption of the Turkish kofte and related to the Middle Eastern kafta. In the Moldavian region of Romania they are also commonly known as parjoale (/pur-joa-le/) although these seem to be a little larger in size than the standard Romanian chiftea. Due to the preference for pork in the Romanian diet, these meatballs are most commonly composed of pork, perhaps in combination with some beef. Lamb chiftele are quite rare in Romanian cuisine. These cauliflower croquettes have a moist, light interior and, if cooked right, a crispy coating. Cauliflower is more usually pickled in Romanian or the whole florets are battered and fried.

Recipe

Wachau Apricot Dumplings

The apricot dumpling, or Marillenknödel, is emblematic for the Wachau region. And it is also a clear illustration of how the Austrian people are open to other cultures. This delicacy combines what is originally a Chinese fruit (the apricot) with a plant from Polynesia (sugar) and an Upper Austrian idea for preparing food (the dumpling). Moreover, the EU certification of controlled origin “Wachauer Marille g.U.” guarantees that these fruits belong to the best of their species.

Ingredients

  • 250 g of sheep cheese
  • 1 pc of onion
  • 50 g of lard
  • 4 pcs of potatoes
  • 1 teaspoon of ground red pepper
  • ½ teaspoon of cumin
  • Black pepper – ground
  • Sour cream, fresh chives

Want to know more about Europe?

Register to the newsletter here: