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Recipe
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Pasties with Sheep Cheese

Boil the potatoes in their skins, peel them. Allow them to cool and prepare the filling. Take 150g of potatoes for the filling. Grate them on a fine grater, add 50g of butter, mix with a pinch of salt. Then add 250g of sheep cheese, chopped spring onions or chives and 1 teaspoon of sour cream. You can also add a little chopped bacon. Mix it and the filling is ready.

For the dough, weigh the required amount of flour and in a bowl. Grate the potatoes on a fine grater. Sprinkle with salt, add the egg, flour and knead the dough. Let it rest a while. Divide the dough into three parts in order to work better. Roll the dough out to about 2 mm thick. With a glass, cut circles out of the dough. Put the filling on each circle, fold the sides of the dough and push them firmly together with a fork. Cook in boiling salted water with the addition of 1 teaspoon of oil. From the boiling point, cook for about 6 minutes. Strain the cooked pirohy, put on a plate, pour the oil from the fried bacon, in which you melt 50g of butter over them. Pour sour cream, and put the chopped spring onions and fried bacon on top of the pirohy.You may also add dill. Milk or buttermilk goes well as a drink with the dish.

 

Source: Slovak Tourist Board

Recipe

Viennese Schnitzel

The true origin of the Wiener Schnitzel has again become a matter of vigorous debate between culinary historians in recent times. One thing, however, is absolutely certain: the Wiener Schnitzel is truly cosmopolitan. The earliest trails lead to Spain, where the Moors were coating meat with breadcrumbs during the Middle Ages. The Jewish community in Constantinople is similarly reported to have known a dish similar to the Wiener Schnitzel in the 12th century. So whether the legend surrounding the import of the “Costoletta Milanese” from Italy to Austria by Field Marshal Radetzky is true or not, a nice story makes very little difference. The main thing is that the schnitzel is tender and crispy!

Recipe

Cauliflower Croquettes

Meatballs of various types are an integral part of Romanian cuisine and the word chiftea (pl. chiftele) (pronounced /kif-te-a/ – /kif-te-le/) is clearly an indication of their Turkish origin, the word being a corruption of the Turkish kofte and related to the Middle Eastern kafta. In the Moldavian region of Romania they are also commonly known as parjoale (/pur-joa-le/) although these seem to be a little larger in size than the standard Romanian chiftea. Due to the preference for pork in the Romanian diet, these meatballs are most commonly composed of pork, perhaps in combination with some beef. Lamb chiftele are quite rare in Romanian cuisine. These cauliflower croquettes have a moist, light interior and, if cooked right, a crispy coating. Cauliflower is more usually pickled in Romanian or the whole florets are battered and fried.

Ingredients

  • 750g potatoes
  • 200g  fine flour
  • ½ teaspoon of salt
  • 1 egg
  • 250g  sheep cheese
  • 100g butter
  • 150 – 200g smoked bacon
  • 250ml sour cream
  • Spring onions or chives, dill

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