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Linz Tart

  1. Create a pile of flour on the work surface, slice the butter into cubes and rub between the fingers into the flour to create a light crumb. Flavour with the cinnamon, a pinch of ground cloves and a little salt, together with the lemon rind or lemon juice. Work quickly to form a smooth short pastry, shape into a ball, cover with film and leave to rest in a cool place for approx. 30 minutes.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 180 °C and grease a suitably-sized spring form cake tin.
  3. Now press a little over half of the dough onto the base of the tin, using the knuckles of the fingers. Shape the remaining dough into several small rolls (for the lattice) and one thicker roll (for the edge). If preferred, cover the pastry base with wafers and coat with smoothly-stirred jam, leaving about 1 cm all round for the edge. Place the thicker roll into the tin as an edging and press down gently. Use the thinner rolls to create a lattice. If preferred, sprinkle with flaked almonds.
  4. Coat the dough with the beaten egg and bake in the pre-heated oven for 50–60 minutes.

Take out the tart, leave to cool and ideally leave to stand for a day, wrapped in film.

Other recipes suggest that the Linzer Torte is made using a softer dough, which is squeezed into the mould in a lattice shape using a piping bag.

Baking time: 50–60 minutes

 

Source: Austrian National Tourist Office

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Ingredients

  • 250 g butter
  • 250 g flour
  • 125 g icing sugar
  • 150 g ground hazelnuts (or almonds)
  • 2 tbsp breadcrumbs
  • 1 egg
  • 1 egg yolk
  • Generous quantity of cinnamon powder
  • A pinch of ground cloves
  • A pinch of salt
  • Grated lemon rind or lemon juice
  • Wafers for layering, as preferred
  • Egg for coating
  • Redcurrant jam for coating
  • Butter for the mould
  • Flaked almonds, as preferred

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