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Bossche Bollen

Heat the water and the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a boil and then turn off the stove. Add the flour and salt, and stir until it all comes together in a ball. Let it cool to the touch. Stir in the egg and continue to stir until the dough has absorbed all the egg and is completely  homogenous

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, divide the dough in four (for smaller bollen) or in two (for large ones) and place it on top of the parchment. Bake in a 200C (425F) degree oven for about 20-25 minutes or until puffy and golden. Cool on a rack.

In the meantime, beat the whipping cream and the sugar until it is stiff. Fill a pastry bag with a small tip and poke through the bottom of the boul. Fill with whipped cream. Heat the chocolate bar and the tablespoon of water in the microwave (30 seconds on medium), stir until the chocolate has melted and the sauce has come together. Cool for about five minutes, then carefully take the cream-filled Bossche bol and dip, head first, into the chocolate. If you don’t want to get your hands dirty, just set the bollen on a rack and slowly pour the chocolate over the top, one spoonful at a time.

Cool in the fridge for about 20 minutes or until the chocolate is solid and everything has had a chance to firm up a bit. Enjoy with a nice cup of coffee and some good company.

 

Source: Holland.com

Recipe

Slovenian Cottage Cheese

Sirovi Štruklj is one of the most characteristic dishes, known all over Slovenia. Štruklji are made from different kinds of dough and can have a wide range of fillings; they can also be baked or cooked, sweet or savory. Until the 1930’s they used to be prepared at holidays and festivities and to celebrate the end of major farm work. The most special kind of štruklji, especially during spring and summer, is prepared with tarragon filling. Other widely known varieties are those with cottage cheese filling, walnut, apple and poppy seed štruklji, along with many others.

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Linz Tart

Anyone engaging in a serious search for the true origin of the Linzer Torte soon finds him or herself travelling between Egypt, Verona and Milwaukee in the American state of Wisconsin. The oldest recorded tart recipe in the world which was written down by a countess in Verona is to be found today in the monastery library in Admont and even became popular in America during the mid-19th century. A cake-maker who moved to Linz in 1822 used the recipe to create the “Linzer Masse”, which was the basis for the grandiose Linz tart. Today it is the culinary emblem of the capital city of Upper Austria.

Ingredients

  • 75 ml (2.5 fl oz) water
  • 30 gram (1 oz) butter
  • 45 grams (1.5 oz) flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 dark chocolate bar
  • 1 tablespoon of water
  • 150 ml (5.2 fl oz) whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons of sugar

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